2023 draft instructions released for Form 1042-S

2023 draft instructions released for Form 1042-S

The IRS has released a draft version of the 2023 instructions for Form 1042-S (Foreign Person’s U.S. Source Income Subject to Withholding).

For those unaware, withholding agents file Form 1042-S to report amounts paid to foreign persons (e.g., salaries, interest, dividends, premiums, pensions, scholarships, and grants) from sources within the U.S. during the preceding calendar year that are subject to withholding. Copy A of Form 1042-S must be filed with the IRS even if:

  • No tax is withheld because the income was exempt from tax under a treaty or under the Internal Revenue Code, including the exemption for income effectively connected with conducting a trade or business in the United States.
  • The amount withheld was repaid to the recipient. This means that Form 1042-S should not be filed if the amount is required to be reported on Form W-2 or 1099.

The instructions have been updated to reflect requirements under IRS Codes 1446(a) and 1446(f) that apply beginning January 1, 2023. These requirements apply to brokers effecting transfers of interests in publicly traded partnerships (PTPs). In addition, two new income codes (57 and 58) and a new chapter 3 status code (39) have been added for new requirements, beginning in 2023.

Regardless if Form 1042-S is filed on paper or electronically, the form is due by March 15 of the following year. Additionally, Form 1042-S must be furnished to recipients of the income by March 15.

Note: Filers of 250 or more Forms 1042-S must file the forms electronically. However, the Taxpayer First Act of 2019 authorizes the Treasury and IRS to issue regulations that reduce the 250-return electronic filing requirement. The IRS has stated that until final regulations are issued, the threshold will remain at 250 returns.

Source: Thomson Reuters

2023 draft instructions released for Form 1042-S

IRS announces 2023 retirement plan dollar limits and thresholds

The IRS has announced the 2023-dollar limits and thresholds for retirement plans, which reflect the latest cost-of-living adjustments.

Note: Dollar limits and thresholds primarily affecting health and welfare plans were announced last week. Here are the limits most relevant to 401(k) plans:

  • Annual Additions: The limit on annual additions (i.e., contributions) to 401(k) and other defined contribution plans will increase to $66,000 (up from $61,000).
  • Compensation: The annual limit on compensation that can be taken into account for contributions and deductions will increase to $330,000 (up from $305,000). 
  • Effective Deferrals: The annual limit on elective deferrals will increase to $22,500 (up from $20,500) for 401(k), 403(b), and 457 plans, as well as Salary Reduction Simplified Employee Pension Plans (SARSEPs), and to $15,500 (up from $14,000) for Savings Incentive Match Plan for Employees (SIMPLE) plans and SIMPLE IRAs.
  • Catch-Up Contributions: The annual limit on catch-up contributions for individuals aged 50 and over will increase to $7,500 (up from $6,500) for 401(k) plans, 403(b) contracts, 457 plans, and SARSEPs, and to $3,500 (up from $3,000) for SIMPLE plans and SIMPLE IRAs.
  • HCE: The threshold for determining who is a highly compensated employee (HCE) will increase to $150,000 (up from $135,000).
  • Key Employee: The threshold for determining whether an officer is a “key employee” under the top-heavy rules (as well as the cafeteria plan nondiscrimination rules) will increase to $215,000 (up from $200,000).
  • SEP Participation: The threshold for determining participation in a SEP or SARSEP will increase to $750 (up from $650).
  • Saver’s Tax Credit: The upper income limit for determining whether certain individuals are eligible for the saver’s tax credit (also known as the retirement savings contributions credit) will increase to $73,000 (up from $68,000) for married filing jointly; to $54,750 (up from $51,000) for head of household; and to $36,500 (up from $34,000) for all other taxpayers.

The IRS has also announced that the amounts for determining who is a “control employee,” a classification relevant to the valuation of company fringe benefits, will increase to $130,000 (up from $120,000), and to $265,000 (up from $245,000) for other employees. In addition, the Social Security Administration separately announced the annual adjustment to the Social Security taxable wage base, which is relevant for various benefit purposes.

There are notable increases in the retirement plan contribution limits for 2023 compared to recent years. Plan sponsors, administrators, and advisors will want to carefully note when the new limits and thresholds apply. Employee communications, plan procedures, and administrative forms should be reviewed and updated as necessary to reflect these changes. 

Source: Thomson Reuters

2023 draft instructions released for Form 1042-S

IRS announces maximum failure to report penalty amounts on late field 2023 returns

The IRS has announced the penalty amounts for failure to file correct 2023 information returns, and failure to furnish correct 2023 payee statements in 2024.

IRS Code 6721 imposes a penalty on a taxpayer for failing to file a correct information return (any 1099 series form or a Form W-2). Code 6722 imposes a penalty for failure to furnish a payee statement (employee’s copy of Form W-2, recipient’s Form 1099) on time, failure to include all information required to be shown on the statement or including incorrect information. The maximum penalty is lower if the taxpayer is a small business. A small business is a taxpayer with average annual gross receipts for the most recent three tax years of $5 million or less.

The amount of the penalty depends on when the return or statement is corrected.

  • The penalty on 2023 information returns required to be filed in 2024, and 2023 payee statements required to be furnished in 2024, that are corrected within 30 days, is $60 per return/statement (currently $50), up to a maximum penalty of $630,500 ($220,500 for small businesses). The maximum penalty is $588,500 on 2022 information returns and payee statements ($206,000 for small businesses).
  • The penalty on 2023 information returns required to be filed in 2024, and 2023 payee statements required to be furnished in 2024, that are corrected later than 30 days after the due date but before August 1st, is $120 per return/statement (currently $110), up to a maximum penalty of $1,891,500 ($630,500 for small businesses). The maximum penalty is $1,766,000 on 2022 information returns and payee statements ($588,500 for small businesses).
  • The penalty on 2023 information returns required to be filed in 2024, and 2023 payee statements required to be furnished in 2024, that are not corrected by August 1 (or if no return or statement is filed at all), is $310 per return/statement ($290 for 2022 information returns), up to a maximum penalty of $3,783,000 ($1,891,500 for small businesses). The maximum penalty is $3,532,500 on 2022 information returns and payee statements ($1,177,500 for small businesses).

Intentional disregard penalty: The intentional disregard penalty for 2023 information returns required to be filed in 2024, and 2023 payee statements required to be furnished in 2024, is $630 per return/statement, or if greater, 10% of the amount required to be shown on the return/statement (without any limit on the maximum penalty in a calendar year). The intentional disregard penalty for 2022 information returns required to be filed in 2023, and 2022 payee statements required to be furnished in 2023, is $580 per return/statement, or if greater, 10% of the amount required to be shown on the return/statement (without any limit on the maximum penalty in a calendar year).

Lastly, for tax returns filed in 2023, the minimum penalty for failure to file a tax return within 60 days of the due date is $485 ($450 for tax returns filed in 2022).

Source: Thomson Reuters

2023 draft instructions released for Form 1042-S

5 HRA FAQs to keep in mind

Health Reimbursement Arrangements (HRAs) are tax-advantaged, employer-funded accounts geared to help pay for qualified medical expenses not covered by a health plan. Months ago, NueSynergy explained the benefits of an HRA. Now, it’s time to discuss five frequently asked questions relating to this account.

FAQ #1: How much can an employer contribute to an employees’ HRA?

An employer can contribute any dollar amount, so long as it’s above a minimum annual commitment of $250 per employee. This commitment is a promise-to-pay, with funds allocated only if and when an eligible claim is incurred.

FAQ #2: When does an HRA start paying for an employee’s expenses?

The employer has two options. They can either allow the HRA to pay before the employee meets any deductible, or they can set it up so an employee has to meet a certain amount of out-of-pocket expenses before an HRA begins to pay.

FAQ #3: Does an HRA provide a tax benefit for employees?

Yes. HRA funds are contributed to employees on a pre-tax basis. This means disbursements aren’t included when calculating taxable income. For this reason, employees cannot claim an income tax deduction for expenses that haven’t been reimbursed under an HRA.

FAQ #4: Do HRA contributions have to be made in equal amounts each month?

They can be, but an HRA can also make contributions available Day 1 of the plan. Regardless of which method, an employer holds the money until qualified expenses are incurred and then reimbursed.

FAQ #5: What happens to HRA funds if an employee leaves the company?

Since funds are funded by an employer, any funds go back to them if an employee terminates for any reason.

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